Tag Archives: extensions

4 Reasons Tamera Mowry Chose Braids

Tamera looks beautiful in her pregnant glow and her beautiful protective style of Braids! Whether you’re pregnant or not Braids are a great protective style for your natural hair.  Always make sure when you get them done that they are not too tight so that you don’t end up with tension alopecia on your scalp. Read Tamera’s story and let me know what you think 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Like many women, I knew during my pregnancy that I was going to need a low maintenance hairstyle when it was time to welcome my baby. Going natural and giving your hair the love and attention it needs is a long journey, and I didn’t want it to suffer any neglect while I was busy with new mommy responsibilities! So with the support and help of the talented Kari Williams of Mahogany Hair Revolution, I was able to protect my natural hair and sport a new style for summer.
1. Its a protective style. Obviously the big draw to braids is that it’s a protective style. What makes me flock to a protective style right now is the fact that during pregnancy and afterward you can lose hair. Braided hair helps keep that from happening as well as helping to prevent breakage, which I’ll talk about next.
Click HERE to read more

Taliah Waajid World Natural Hair Show October 2014

Hello everyone.  Ok,  so I know the show was two weeks ago but I’ve been so swamped with hair clients that this is the first chance I’ve had to post anything about the show.  So here it goes…… I had a blast!!  I hadn’t been to the show in a few years and was excited to get back in the mix.  Thankfully this time i was invited back as part of a class that was taught by my mother, Juliette Samuel (esthetician/aromatherapist of Nyraju Skin Care) and Delbra Morris (aromatherapist of Aromatherapy Essentials).  The class was Aromatherapy and Essential Oils for Natural Hair Care.  We had a great amount of attendees for both our Saturday and Sunday classes.  Class got so good at one point that Delbra ended up doing a reflexology demonstration with essential oils as well 🙂 I’m excited to let you know that we will be back with a class for the show in April 2015.  I will of course keep you all posted on the dates as I receive them. Below are some pics from our class.

In between classes i had the chance to walk the show floor a bit and saw Lyfe Jennings perform for a bit. I also had the pleasure of meeting the inventor of the Q Redew.  Her name is Heidi Schmid.  Its a fantastic styling tool for all hair types but especially 3b-4c.  It helps to add moisture to your hair and gives you the chance to reshape it in between shampoo days. Below are more photos from the show itself.

If you attended the show leave a comment and let me know what you thought about it 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

My Loc Extension Journey

We all know how fun, or not so fun, it can be transitioning our loose natural tresses to a fully loc’d form. It takes a lot of hard work, and most importantly, it takes patience. However, with everything in life, we tend to want things instantly with little to no hassle whatsoever. Basically, if we can’t get it over night, there’s no point in putting forth the effort, but if things were that easy, would we enjoy what we gain even more than if  were to work hard for it?

Loc Extensions

Having locs is like having a personal garden on your head. You reap what you sow, and based on how well you take care of your coiffure terrace, the better we understand and appreciate our hair. And with any stage of growth we have our favorite lengths. For me, I enjoyed my neck-length period the most. With that said, we also have our not so favorite lengths as well, which many usually agree it is the baby loc stage that is most disliked. As a male, the baby loc stage didn’t bother me as much, but to many loc’d women whom I’ve had the pleasure of speaking with, that stage is the most dreaded. . .pun intended? Perhaps.

Admittedly almost 8 years with locs, I too found myself not happy with some of my new growth that refused to blend in with my veteran locs. Whether palm rolled or interlocked, each of my new growth was rebellious and would rather be counted as an individual loc instead of part of the already loc’d crowd. I’m glad my hair wanted to do its own thing, but I’m the one flipping the bill to keep it maintained, so it needed to get in where it fitted in! Alas, I wanted my head to be happy, so instead of dueling both baby and grown-up locs, I found a happy medium that we all could agree on, Loc Extensions!

Keep in mind, I’m a dude who is very secure in my sexuality to the point that I am rolling my own eyes at writing this sentence! I don’t think of loc extensions as a trendy weave. Even Nyesha had her qualms about loc extensions; however, loc extensions can help bridge the gap between those who are a little anxious about rocking locs without having to go through the baby stages, and those who have a few sprouts they want uniformed to their lengthy neighbors, both rocking what appears to be healthy kinky locs confidently. Real talk, people wouldn’t know that I have approximately 13 loc extensions on my head right now just because a few baby locs wanted to stand out from their more mature brethren, and I’ve had them in for a little over a year and a half, and again, no one knows a thing unless I’ve told them!

Think about it. I have long locs, but I still had loc extensions placed in to keep all my locs uniformed. If you’re starting to transition into locs, but you really don’t want to worry about upkeep on mini locs, or you simply just don’t have the time, loc extensions are a good way to go in saving you in time, saving you in money (because starting locs can be expensive), and most importantly saving you in patience! You get to see how you look fully loc’d and loaded with kinky strands of greatness at the length of your choice, although I’d recommend a sensible short length for first time transitioners so that your hair and the extensions meld together to aid in the locking process. That way, as your natural locs and grow, a little bit of the extension can be snipped away until you forget you even had loc extensions in the first place.

Just know that whatever stage your natural hair is going through in your loc journey, it’s a wonderful process. Impatience is expected because you can’t contain your excitement in seeing the final result. The cool thing about our hair is that there is no “final” result because our hair is ever changing in some way. Loc extensions only enhance what you already have going on. As long as you tend to your kinky garden, you’ll be proud of your harvest, baby or matured, extensions or none.

– Kevin L. Tarver

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Oregon Natural Hair Act may ease licensing regulations for hair braiders

I think there should be some type of training that braiding stylist go through to do hair, BUT, I don’t think they should have to go to the same schools that chemical stylist go to.  There are so many braid shops tearing peoples edges out because they braid too tightly or use synthetic hair that many are allergic to.   I pride myself on putting the health of my clients hair above all else, but many stylist just want the money and don’t care what condition they leave your hair in.  Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Portland-area lawmakers say they hope to ease Oregon’s regulations on people who braid hair, a service that now requires a state license.

Oregon is criminalizing hair braiders or forcing them to go to Washington, Rep. Alissa Keny-Guyer told The Oregonian.

The bill planned for the legislative session next year is called the Natural Hair Act, the paper (http://is.gd/9VoMk5 ) said Monday in a report that highlighted the case of Amber Starks.

Starks, 31, started a hair-braiding business in Vancouver, Wash., after she discovered she needed a cosmetology license to do the work in Oregon.

That could mean spending up to 1,700 hours in a beauty school with tuition of more than $10,000 and taking tests with many questions about chemicals. Braiders typically do not use chemicals, heat or scissors.

Click below to read the full article;

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/291d4b65e8e046cbae23d8b54979244f/OR–Hair-Braiding

 

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Transitions to Natural Hair – Video

This video by Zina Saro-Wiwa made me shed a tear of joy.  I know it’s a little sappy and extra of me to be so moved by it, but it really made me proud to the point of tears.  In the video Zina talks about her 7 month journey to loving her natural hair after wearing extensions for a long time.  Zina and the other “naturals” in the video are absolutely beautiful !  If I wasn’t already 17 years natural myself I would be getting a big chop tomorrow after seeing all the beauty on display here. Leave a comment and let me know what you think 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Click below to watch the video;

 

The ABC’s of Natural Hair Decoded

I cracked up laughing when I found this article because there are a lot of little natural hair codes that are a bit much to take in when you’re transitioning 🙂 I hope this article helps the natural newbies and long time naturals who want to know all the latest natural hair codes.  If you have some that you don’t see in the article please leave a comment and share them 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Are you a PJ who BC’d and loves a good WNG?  There’s a lot of jargon thrown around on natural hair blogs and forums, and if you’re new to the conversation, it can be quite puzzling.  Well, you can (TMN) thank me now because I’m about to help you decipher the word play, so you can get clear on what it all means for you.

A is for APL (Arm Pit Length) which refers to length.  BSL (Bra Strap Length), CL (Collar Length), MBL (Mid Back Length) and WL (Waist Length) are all common descriptors.

B is for BC (Big Chop). This is the courageous act of chopping off your relaxed hair. Some opt to do the Big Chop with only an inch or so of new growth remaining on their heads leaving them with a TWA (Teeny Weeny Afro).  Another option is the (LTT )Long Term Transition where you cut the relaxed hair out gradually.  Either way, the first day you step out with your freedom hair (relaxer free) is a milestone moment.  Relish it.

Click below to read the full article;

http://www.transitioningmovement.com/Default.aspx?CN=4E11AA0E5382

‘In Our Heads About Our Hair’ (Trailer) – Documentary On Black Hair

I can’t wait to see the full version of this documentary when it is released.  It looks like it’s going to be very informative from every angle of hair care.  Leave a comment and let me know what you think of the trailer 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Click below to watch the trailer;

 

In Our Heads About Our Hair – Trailer from Hemamset Angaza on Vimeo.

Did Somebody Say Good Hair? Part 2/2 Women Who LOVE Their Natural Hair!

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

 

Part 2 of that great video from earlier.  Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Click below to watch video;

 

Did Somebody Say Good Hair? Part 1/2 – Women Who LOVE Their Natural Hair!

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

 

This is an excellent interview on natural hair. Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Click below to watch video;

 

Do You Care For Your Hair?

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Kinky, coily, curly, napptastically natural; these are all words and phrases I’ve heard used to describe my year-old untamed mane. I say year old because it was only last July that I stopped putting chemicals on my hair and scalp completely. I cut the perms and relaxers (even color, farewell to my burgundy low lighted streaks) and completely let my tress grow to its now ferociously fabulous state. ‘Going natural,’ as it is often referred to has been one of the most enlightening and rewarding promenade I’ve had in my 21 years of life.

I’d liken the journey of going natural to falling in a deeply obsessive and unrelenting love affair, although I wasn’t always this smitten. When ‘they’, those ominously adept natural voices of the world, tell you going natural is a journey they aren’t kidding. No hyperbole here. You begin like a baby taking its first steps and end up like a long distance marathon runner with big brand name endorsements. Personally, my natural journey began by accident which made my transition between chemical and chemical-free rough to say the least (pun intended).

Though I may have enjoyed the convenience of having ‘relaxed’ straight hair, the chemicals had made it limp, unhealthy, and prone to breakage. Eventually I gave up on taking care of my hair all together and simply opted to wearing extensions. Turns out, I had them in for so long my perm simply grew out. No fuss, no harm; or so I thought. Little did I know I had missed a crucial in-between step of the process where you learn to manage your natural hair for the first time.

Click below to read the full article;

http://www.now.org/news/blogs/index.php/sayit/2011/10/19/do-you-care-for-your-hair

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...