Tag Archives: Braids

Black Hair Styles for Your Natural Tresses

The right protective styles are a must to help your natural hair grow long and strong.  Below is an article that gives you some options on the right style for you. Leave a comment and let me know what you think 🙂

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Have you gotten so comfortable with your hair that you no longer explore and experiment with new hairstyles?

Water challenges, which are real by the way, got you frustrated with the look and feel of your hair. Probably!

You’ve spent years nurturing your beautiful black hair, having your locs done without fail every two weeks, especially in the beginning phase. And now that you’ve gotten that long awaited ponytail that you can swing from side to side whenever you want too, your creativity has been lulled to sleep.

Sound familiar? What happened to those sweet up dos, beautiful chignons, that cute French roll or side sweep? I’m just saying, there might have been a time when you put more energy into styling your natural tresses and expressing yourself through your hairstyles.

Click HERE to read more

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

4 Reasons Tamera Mowry Chose Braids

Tamera looks beautiful in her pregnant glow and her beautiful protective style of Braids! Whether you’re pregnant or not Braids are a great protective style for your natural hair.  Always make sure when you get them done that they are not too tight so that you don’t end up with tension alopecia on your scalp. Read Tamera’s story and let me know what you think 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Like many women, I knew during my pregnancy that I was going to need a low maintenance hairstyle when it was time to welcome my baby. Going natural and giving your hair the love and attention it needs is a long journey, and I didn’t want it to suffer any neglect while I was busy with new mommy responsibilities! So with the support and help of the talented Kari Williams of Mahogany Hair Revolution, I was able to protect my natural hair and sport a new style for summer.
1. Its a protective style. Obviously the big draw to braids is that it’s a protective style. What makes me flock to a protective style right now is the fact that during pregnancy and afterward you can lose hair. Braided hair helps keep that from happening as well as helping to prevent breakage, which I’ll talk about next.
Click HERE to read more

Woman Misses Out On Job Due To Her Hair

It’s so messed up that to this day traditional African styles are not scene as professional.  I’m happy that she stuck to her guns and didn’t fry her hair to get the job 🙂

Leave a comment below and let me know what you think 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Taliah Waajid World Natural Hair Show October 2014

Hello everyone.  Ok,  so I know the show was two weeks ago but I’ve been so swamped with hair clients that this is the first chance I’ve had to post anything about the show.  So here it goes…… I had a blast!!  I hadn’t been to the show in a few years and was excited to get back in the mix.  Thankfully this time i was invited back as part of a class that was taught by my mother, Juliette Samuel (esthetician/aromatherapist of Nyraju Skin Care) and Delbra Morris (aromatherapist of Aromatherapy Essentials).  The class was Aromatherapy and Essential Oils for Natural Hair Care.  We had a great amount of attendees for both our Saturday and Sunday classes.  Class got so good at one point that Delbra ended up doing a reflexology demonstration with essential oils as well 🙂 I’m excited to let you know that we will be back with a class for the show in April 2015.  I will of course keep you all posted on the dates as I receive them. Below are some pics from our class.

In between classes i had the chance to walk the show floor a bit and saw Lyfe Jennings perform for a bit. I also had the pleasure of meeting the inventor of the Q Redew.  Her name is Heidi Schmid.  Its a fantastic styling tool for all hair types but especially 3b-4c.  It helps to add moisture to your hair and gives you the chance to reshape it in between shampoo days. Below are more photos from the show itself.

If you attended the show leave a comment and let me know what you thought about it 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Braided Hairstyles We’ll Always Love!

Braids are one of the easiest styles (well, maybe not the fishtail braid) that we can do when we just can’t muster up enough energy to blow-dry our hair. We’re pretty sure our mothers had the same idea back in our younger days. But braided hairstyles have also had a huge cultural significance, according to celebrity stylist and salon owner Ted Gibson.

Gibson explained, “In Egypt, braids were worn by royalty or reserved for ceremonial purposes like weddings. In Native American tradition, single women often wore their hair in braids with flowers in them as a way to attract a mate, while married women wore their hair down. In European history, common women plaited their hair in simple braids as a way to keep their hair out of their faces while they worked, while high society ladies wore their hair in more elaborate braids. In Africa, women wear braids in different patterns and designs to show their personality.”

Today in American culture, braids often symbolize youth. Just think of famous TV characters like Laura Ingalls on “Little House on the Prairie,” Cindy on “The Brady Bunch” and even “Moesha.” (Ed. note: This author sported just about every braided hairstyle Brandy did on her popular ’90s sitcom from middle to high school.)

Click here to read the full article

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

4 Ways to Repair Hair Breakage

Don’t freak out over hair breakage it happens to the best of us. To correct damage here are four easy steps that you can take to restore your hair’s health.

Avoid rubber bands or clips that will easily tangle your hair. Rubber bands are especially good for putting stress on your hair and ripping it out. After your hair has experienced breakage, rubber bands are the last thing that you want to use.

Stop over manipulating your hair. Give your hair a resting period with a protective natural hair style. You can wear twists, box braids, cornrows, buns, or pretty much anything that protects the ends of your hair. If you don’t mind wearing wigs, cornrow your hair, moisturize it every day and wear a quick wig for a couple of weeks. They are great for easy styling, can be purchased in kinky-curly textures; giving your hair a well deserved break.

Click below to read the full article;

http://blacknaps.org/2011/10/23/repair-black-hair-breakage/

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

African-American women talk about embracing their natual hair

The debate over Olympic gold medal gymnast Gabby Douglas’ hair shouldn’t come as a surprise. The controversy surrounding her ’do, which some African-Americans thought was poorly-styled, speaks to how passionate the topic and imagery of black hair has historically been within the culture.

The debate over Douglas’ ponytail certainly got more ink because of the Olympics, but at the same time, social media sites were debating Oprah Winfrey’s decision to wear a natural hairstyle on the September cover of her magazine, O.

In Rochester and across the country, more African-American women — including powerhouses such as Xerox CEO Ursula Burns — have embraced “au naturale” hairstyles, abandoning more popular relaxed styles.

Once seen as an anti-assimilation declaration, “going natural,” or no longer chemically straightening one’s hair, is coming full circle as a less radical and increasingly popular trend among African-American women, who are embracing their naturally “kinky” or “tightly-curled” manes instead.

Click below to read the full article;

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20120814/LIVING/308140042/Gabby-Douglas-Oprah-Winfrey-Ursula-Burns?nclick_check=1

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Oregon Natural Hair Act may ease licensing regulations for hair braiders

I think there should be some type of training that braiding stylist go through to do hair, BUT, I don’t think they should have to go to the same schools that chemical stylist go to.  There are so many braid shops tearing peoples edges out because they braid too tightly or use synthetic hair that many are allergic to.   I pride myself on putting the health of my clients hair above all else, but many stylist just want the money and don’t care what condition they leave your hair in.  Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Portland-area lawmakers say they hope to ease Oregon’s regulations on people who braid hair, a service that now requires a state license.

Oregon is criminalizing hair braiders or forcing them to go to Washington, Rep. Alissa Keny-Guyer told The Oregonian.

The bill planned for the legislative session next year is called the Natural Hair Act, the paper (http://is.gd/9VoMk5 ) said Monday in a report that highlighted the case of Amber Starks.

Starks, 31, started a hair-braiding business in Vancouver, Wash., after she discovered she needed a cosmetology license to do the work in Oregon.

That could mean spending up to 1,700 hours in a beauty school with tuition of more than $10,000 and taking tests with many questions about chemicals. Braiders typically do not use chemicals, heat or scissors.

Click below to read the full article;

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/291d4b65e8e046cbae23d8b54979244f/OR–Hair-Braiding

 

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

How to Protect Your Natural Hair

At first glance, afro textured hair would appear resilient. It’s thick, it’s full, it’s cottony, it looks pretty darned tough, but looks can be deceiving. Natural African American hair is actually one of the most delicate hair textures that there is. It doesn’t take much to damage it at all, so if you want to maintain a head full of beautiful curls there are a few general safety rules that must be followed.

Wrap it up
A large majority of our hair’s damage occurs while we’re sleeping. We toss, we turn, and all the while the delicate ends of our hair are being ripped apart by the friction of it rubbing against a cotton pillow. To prevent splitting ends while you slumber, wrap your hair up in a silk or satin scarf before bed, or purchase a satin pillow case.

Maintain Moisture
African American hair needs moisture to thrive. A spray bottle full of water is your hair’s best (and cheapest) friend. Condition your hair regularly, and if you feel it drying out throughout the day, give it a quick spritz of water. For added moisture add a tiny amount of your favorite conditioner to the bottle as well for inexpensive leave in conditioning.

Click below to read the full article;

http://voices.yahoo.com/how-protect-natural-hair-11489346.html

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Transitions to Natural Hair – Video

This video by Zina Saro-Wiwa made me shed a tear of joy.  I know it’s a little sappy and extra of me to be so moved by it, but it really made me proud to the point of tears.  In the video Zina talks about her 7 month journey to loving her natural hair after wearing extensions for a long time.  Zina and the other “naturals” in the video are absolutely beautiful !  If I wasn’t already 17 years natural myself I would be getting a big chop tomorrow after seeing all the beauty on display here. Leave a comment and let me know what you think 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Click below to watch the video;

 

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