Tag Archives: black hair

Woman Misses Out On Job Due To Her Hair

It’s so messed up that to this day traditional African styles are not scene as professional.  I’m happy that she stuck to her guns and didn’t fry her hair to get the job 🙂

Leave a comment below and let me know what you think 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

To Pick or Not To Pick?

This is a great write up by one of our guest Bloggers, Kevin.  In it he explores his decision to possibly get rid of his locs.  I went through this journey myself.  Unlike Kevin I didn’t think it through for too long.  I just started picking out lint and accidentally picked a whole loc out lol From there it was on! I kept going and love my now loose natural hair.  But i will say I miss my locs everyday and will eventually be locing again.  One thing to always keep in mind is what will you do with your hair after you take the locs out or off.  Its work people!  Locs are definitely easier lol Leave a comment below and let Kevin and I know what you think about picking out locs verses just cutting them off 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

To Pick or Not To Pick? – By Guest Blogger Kevin Tarver

There’s comes a time in your natural hair journey where you reach a crossroads. You reach a peak of what I like to call “tress distress” because you no longer know what to do with your healthy natural hair. You’ve twisted it out, you’ve done every up-do known to mankind, you’ve accessorized your hair to to no end, and you’ve tried every color dye that you could think of to liven up your kinky natural hair. And so you may ask, “What’s wrong with that?” And I say, “Absolutely nothing!”

Our natural hair is uniquely versatile, taking on many styles that suit our fancy. Alas, I’m at a place where I’m thinking of doing something different with my locs since I’ve had them for such a long time, 8 years to be exact. Admittedly, I’m a low maintenance loc wearing dude, so, you may not catch me with fantastic loc accessories or luxurious natural hair dyes all up in my head, although I’ve heavily considered those options. Nope, I just stick to keeping it either in a bun or ponytail. Daring, ain’t it?

But I dare consider doing something completely different to my healthy locs. I’m contemplating picking my locs out! Yes, I’m thinking about changing my whole natural hair game up by taking a good quality rat tail comb, or some variant device, and picking my locs out. You see, I could just snip each individual loc, then let my barber do the rest, but I feel that since I took the time to grow out my locs, I might as well take the time out and unravel them myself.

Sure, you can speed of the process by having a few good friends help you out, along with some good snacks, good music, and some good laughs, but I feel it would be somewhat spiritual just to have that alone time with yourself and your healthy hair. From what I know, it will take some days, maybe over a week to complete, so if you’re always out and about, you may need a backup plan, but I mostly work from home. Don’t get me wrong, I’m still contemplating the decision, but I do know if I were to ever let my locs go, I still want a full head of my African American hair dancing atop my head. Besides, loc picking isn’t the only way for me to let my locs go while maintaining length or fullness of my natural unloc’d hair.

I had a good friend who decided to let her locs go, but kept a good amount of her unloc’d natural hair. She allowed her new growth to flourish, never getting her new growth twisted or interlocked into her locs. Imagine the surprise of classmates when she left class with auburn locs swinging pat her shoulders only to come to class the next day with her natural hair “stretched,” possibly pressed, almost shoulder length hair. I tell you, the versatility of our hair is something major.

So, I have a few things to think about as my healthy locs are pulled back in a wild bun. I mean, I still have so many options to explore, like dying my locs, or rocking a funky afro-punk loc style. However, I want to make a change, and a simple loc trim won’t do. Whatever I decide, I’ll be sure to let you know!

So, talk to me, should I pick my locs or try other styles? What would you do?

Black Hair: The Missing Education

“Why does she wear an afro?” “Why is her hair styled that way?”

These questions spur a conversation about Afro-textured hair that should be occurring. The lack of this conversation has resulted in discriminatory events, for example, this past week Tiffany Bryan, a 27-year-old cancer survivor from New York, was fired from her job for wearing an Afro. This event is not the first: Within the last 12 months soldiers in the military, grade school students, university students and hard-working members of society have been discriminated against because of their hairstyle.

http://www.africancurls.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/wedding-hairstyles-for-natural-hair-449.jpg

These women wore their hair in Afros, twist, dreadlocks and braids not because of some hair fad, but because these styles are essential for their texture of hair. Each of these events, created by a lack of fundamental knowledge on Black hair, offers an opportunity for us to talk openly about the hair of women of color. If the people that committed these acts of discrimination understood that the morphological differences of Afro-textured hair requires a different type of hair care and hairstyles than other ethnic groups, future events of discrimination can be avoided.

Click HERE to read more

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

We Love Tamron Halls Natural Curls!

It has been a few months since Tamron Hall shared her natural curls with the world, but i still wanted to take the time out to say congratulations Tamron! Below is an article on how the reveal went down.  Leave a comment and let me know what you think 🙂

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Tamron Hall, the “Today” show’s first African-American female co-host, unexpectedly revealed her natural kinks and curls on national television.

After the unveiling, the news program – in an “I can’t believe they’re actually doing this” move – polled its audience regarding whether Hall, 43, should stick with her natural look on-air.

Somewhat surprisingly and thankfully – given White America’s well-documented resistance to African-American women who buck conventional beauty ideals – 70 percent of viewers who tweeted in response said that Hall’s tightly curled style was a winner.

For many black women – even for those for whom unprocessed hair is no longer anything novel – her choice, and the reaction to it, do matter.

Click HERE to read more

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

We need books celebrating black kids’ hair!

African-American children’s books are a growing area of publishing, but we need even more selections for this burgeoning market — particularly black children’s books that celebrate black kids’ hair. Why? A harrowing experience was inflicted on my son when we tried to access basic black children’s hair care services — at a black establishment.

The day that it happened had been, up until that moment, a fairly happy day.  I had left my husband at home to work on our shoe line and had gone to Queens, NY with our two boys to spend time with their grandparents. My parents commented that my three-year-old boy, Jojo, could use a haircut, so my father and I left my then six-month-old baby boy, Miles, at home with my mother and went out in search of a barber shop and professional hair care for my black child.

We entered a shop that looked reasonably empty. The sound of reggae music filled the air and Jamaican flags decorated the walls. My family is of Ghanaian origin, and we know Jamaicans are our “brethren,” so we thought that we would feel at home.

Click HERE to read the full article

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Master Loctician/Publisher for healthylocsblog.com

Braided Hairstyles We’ll Always Love!

Braids are one of the easiest styles (well, maybe not the fishtail braid) that we can do when we just can’t muster up enough energy to blow-dry our hair. We’re pretty sure our mothers had the same idea back in our younger days. But braided hairstyles have also had a huge cultural significance, according to celebrity stylist and salon owner Ted Gibson.

Gibson explained, “In Egypt, braids were worn by royalty or reserved for ceremonial purposes like weddings. In Native American tradition, single women often wore their hair in braids with flowers in them as a way to attract a mate, while married women wore their hair down. In European history, common women plaited their hair in simple braids as a way to keep their hair out of their faces while they worked, while high society ladies wore their hair in more elaborate braids. In Africa, women wear braids in different patterns and designs to show their personality.”

Today in American culture, braids often symbolize youth. Just think of famous TV characters like Laura Ingalls on “Little House on the Prairie,” Cindy on “The Brady Bunch” and even “Moesha.” (Ed. note: This author sported just about every braided hairstyle Brandy did on her popular ’90s sitcom from middle to high school.)

Click here to read the full article

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher/Master Loctician for healthylocsblog.com

Natural Hair in the Mainstream !

When I saw this commercial for the first time the other day i thought it was the best one of the week!  I was so happy to see the beautiful women and girls sporting their healthy natural hair and flawless chocolate skin in this ad. Good job on the casting of this commercial Ford 🙂  Leave a comment and let me know what you think 🙂

 

 

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs,

Nyesha Samuel, Master Loctician/Publicist for healthylocsblog.com

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