Yearly Archives: 2010

Is the Brazilian Blowout and Keratin Treatment Good for Black Hair?

Ok, so ya’ll know I’m never really for straightening the hair with any kind of chemical or so called natural straightener. I’m still not. But this article is very interesting. It’s about the Brazilian Blowout technique that women have been raving about to straighten their hair. As I’ve said in the past, a hot comb or a blow dryer in moderation are the only 2 methods that I tolerate if you just have to straighten your hair for a change, but I’d prefer those not to be used either if one can help it.

Read the article & leave a comment to let me know what you think. Also if you’ve tried the Brazilian Blowout let us know what your results were. Peace 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Is the Brazilian Blowout and Keratin Treatment Good for Black Hair?

Beauty editors of the other persuasion have been singing the praises of the Brazilian Blowout. But is it good for Black Hair?

Having heard of the treatment and knowing fellow beauty bloggers who have had the treatment done but never trying it out myself (sounds too expensive for my blood…lol), I dug in to do some research.

Turns out the ‘Brazilian Blowout’ is actually a trademarked name. According to brazilianblowoutblog.com, it’s often misconstrued and explained wrong as there are a number of “Brazilian” hair techniques on the market at the moment. In fact they ask you to not confuse the process which uses keratin with processes that use formaldehyde. Yes, formaldehyde–the stuff used to embalm dead bodies. *shivers*

Click below to read the full article;

http://bitchielife.necolebitchie.com/2010/08/is-the-brazilian-blowout-and-keratin-treatment-good-for-black-hair/

Why is it that every OTHER woman can wear her “natural” hair and it’s okay ?

Why is it that every OTHER woman can wear her “natural” hair and it’s okay ?

This is a question that was raised by a client of mine while I was working on his hair.  My long story short answer was that Black/African American women have been told that their hair in it’s natural state is ugly and therefore are the ones who constantly fight to hide their natural hair. Usually women of other races are the ones who’s hair is looked at as the gold standard (curly, straight, flowing, etc) so they tend to be more comfortable with their hair in it’s natural state.

He was frustrated because he wanted more Black/African American women to feel beautiful rocking their hair natural. I told him to keep up the good work supporting natural sistas and he would be doing a good service for the natural hair movement 🙂

I know a few women who used to be natural and caved in to the pressure of work and peers to go back to perming. Needless to say, their hair suffered the consequence and now they are in the process of going back to natural to avoid being balled.

I know a few women who lost their man because they chose to go natural. There are men who are so insecure that they can’t even handle being with a Black/African American woman who loves herself enough to wear her hair natural. Sad on the man’s part, but kudos to the woman. And it goes both ways fellas, I know women who won’t go near a man who has locs or an afro because they say it looks messy. Pure madness.

What are some of your thoughts on the subject of Black/African American women becoming more “okay” with loving their hair in it’s natural state ?

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

The Golden Rule For Amazing Hair

This is a pretty good article on keeping hair healthy during the summer months no matter what state it’s in. The conditioning and trimming tips are on point.  Not so into the sunscreen on the hair move, sounds like a perm head thing to me. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Peace 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Glorious, shiny hair is not a matter of luck —it is a matter of good hair care. During the summer, the sun’s heat rays can be very damaging, causing hair to become dry, brittle and frizzy. A few simple summer hair care tips will help you keep hair strong and healthy. When it is time to turn on the air conditioning, it is also time to step up the hair conditioning. Regular conditioning treatments are important to keep hair moisturized, shinny and flexible. Don’t take shortcuts when it comes to summer’s hair care regime.

Click below to read the full article;

http://www.blackdoctor.org/articles1.aspx?counter=37442

Jill Scott: From Natural to Relaxed?

There’s been a lot of heat this week over Jill Scott’s new hair do.  Many out there believe that she has gone over to the dark side and put creamy crack aka a perm in her hair after being natural for years. Honestly to me it doesn’t look like she permed her hair. It looks like a blow out or a press. I could be wrong, but I hope not. Wishful thinking on my part. Cute cut either way.

I’m all for trying new hair styles and expressing yourself as long as you’re not killing your hair in the process.  So I’m hoping like many of you out there that this is just a temporary blow out or press and not permanent damage via a perm.

Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Peace 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Hair Care Tips for African American Children

So in general I agree with the tips in this article. Mostly on point as far as how to care for natural hair for African American children. Until it comes to the end, where they have a section on permed or relaxed hair. By now you all know that I’m not feeling a perm on adults, so I’m damn sure not digging it on a child.  For me a perm on a child should be considered some for of child abuse. Not cool at all. But as far as caring for natural hair goes the article is pretty on point 🙂  Enjoy & let me know what you think. Peace 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Hair Care Tips for African American Children

African American hair requires special care because it is dry, kinky and fragile. Properly caring for your child’s hair is important because damage to the hair follicles that results from improper care is likely to remain with the child for life.

Washing

African American hair dries out easily. Because of this, you should only shampoo your child’s hair every 7 to 10 days, according to the University of Pittsburgh. For a child that has curly or thick hair, you can choose a section the hair off when washing it to minimize tangling. Additionally, find a shampoo that doesn’t contain lauryl sulfate or laureth sulfate as these ingredients strip natural oils off the hair, which can lead to breakage.

How to Care for Natural, Short African-American Hair

This is a great article on how to care for natural African American hair when it’s short. Really good healthy tips on caring for your hair.  Many who are making the transition from chemicals to natural don’t know exactly what to do for their new natural hair. The tips in the following article are a great start. Let me know what you think and leave a comment with any tips you may have that you’ve learned since going natural. Peace 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Overview

Natural, short African American hair can be difficult to deal with, especially when most hair products are made for Caucasian hair. Luckily, when you cut your hair short, its natural texture is more able to shine through, and the kinky curls of most African American’s hair can be coaxed into submission by using the right products and styling techniques. Take tips from top hairstylists who work mostly with African Americans to learn how to best care for natural, short, African American hair.

Is natural hair just a fad ?

Is natural hair just a fad ? As a Loctician I see natural hair from all walks of life.  I know men going natural or who have been natural for spiritual and cultural reasons, but then I know others who  just want locs because Lil Wayne has them.  I know women with beautiful full healthy afros who would never go back to creamy crack ( aka a perm), but then there are others who fried their afros back into a perm as soon as their favorite singer switched back to a perm or weave or wigs.

I’ve even seen some online talking about their going back to a perm because it’s easier to manage than their locs. In the words of Ed Lover, C’mon Son. No way on gods green earth is styling a perm everyday easier than shaking your locs out and keeping it movin. I know all about having to deal with perm everyday. Had one until 1995 and you can’t pay me to go back to that mess everyday.

I had a woman call me asking me if I could sew a track of locs into her hair for the week. I couldn’t believe my ears. I was cordial, but there was no way I was agreeing to that one. I love and appreciate my clients, but I have my limits.  Natural hair is not a trend or a fad for me, it’s a lifestyle choice, a spiritual and cultural connection to your true self no matter how you chose to wear it.

So I had to ask, how do you all feel about natural hair being nothing more than a fad or a trend ?

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel- Publisher of healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Good job REI !

Just saw this commercial and was very happy to see a beautiful family with the mother and daughter both rocking natural hair. Of course they’re paid actors, but the image was still nice to see 🙂  Not many companies have the guts to let Black Women wear their natural hair in advertisements.  So I wanted to take a moment to say, Good job REI for allowing the Curly Afro and 2 Strand Twist to have have 30 seconds of fame on tv ! 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs !

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Click below to view the commercial

Loc Extensions – A blessing or a curse ?

Years ago I was totally against loc extensions and to an extent I still am depending on why a person wants to get them.  Back in the day, loc extensions used to look horrible.  They were either shiny silky locs or hard looking yarn locs.  Now a days though, the loc extension game has definitely changed. Some look so real that only the trained eye can tell if they’re fake or not.

I still have a problem with them if a person is getting them just for a trendy look, but I happen to think they are a great option for a person who is transitioning from permed hair into locs.  These days I offer loc extensions as part of my natural hair care services.  But many will tell you that I have turned them down if I felt like they were just getting locs put in for the weekend. I don’t play that.  The clients I tend to do the loc extensions for are women (and some men) who are going natural from a perm and already know that locs is what they want.

When I grew my perm out back in 1995, I wore extension braids for about 6 months while I waited for my 2 inch afro to grow out so I could start my locs later.  It was Spring/Summer and the braids made it easier for me to not have to think about what to do with my hair while I transitioned.  Well there are some women in that same position now and it’s easier for them to skip the braid step and go straight into loc extensions.  Because I went through the process I know how it can be so I have no problem doing loc extensions for somone in that case. Trust, I’d prefer if everyone started their locs the traditional way from a 2 inch afro like i did.  I’d prefer if people weren’t afraid of the so called “ugly phase” ( i hate that term ) that happens during the transition the 1st year of growing locs. But the truth is most people are still stuck in “neat” mode with their hair, even when going natural.  So for me if it comes down to a perm or loc extensions, I’m definitely going to tell someone to go for the loc extensions until their own hair can grow out.

See loc extensions for me are supposed to be used as a tool to help the natural transition. A good loctician will tell you to trim a few inches of loc extension off every year as your own hair grows out in locs so that eventually there will be no loc extension left, there will just be your own natural beautiful head of locs in the end.

Some people argue that people who get loc extensions done don’t appreciate their locs the same way that someone who started from scratch does. But trust and believe that I have done enough heads to know that there are actually people out there who appreciate their locs equally no matter how they started them. They’re just happy to be out of chemicals and in love with their natural hair no matter how their journey began.

Leave a comment and let me know what you think 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

The Beginning (and End) of the Hair Wars

This is a funny and sad article about one woman’s journey to natural hair beginning when she was 12 year old. Great tribute to her dad for father’s day 🙂 Those of us who’ve gone from a perm to natural know exactly how funny and sad this story is 🙂 Thankfully there’s a happy ending where she ends up going natural and feeling free ! Enjoy and leave a comment to let me know how you feel about her journey. Peace 🙂

Healthy Scalp, Healthy Locs

Nyesha Samuel, Publisher for healthylocsblog.com & Master Loctician

Click below to read the full article;

http://dove.msn.com/?source=msnhp#/connections/columns/BQ_Response_DMillner.aspx[cp-documentid=23968745]&gt1=25039

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